refugees #5
reportage

refugees #5

The refugee and migrant crisis has been going on for many years without Europe having found answers to this humanitarian crisis. In 2010 I visited Athens for the Red Cross to focus on the chaos that prevailed in Greece. In practice, the asylum system was broken down and refugees lived in poverty in the streets, in crowded apartments and in camps on the islands. People slept outside a police station and tried every day to submit their asylum applications. People stood in long queues outside places where food was being distributed. A mother with her young children had been sent back from Denmark with reference to the Dublin regulation and lived on some mattresses in a corner of a crowded apartment ...
urbanization
reportage

urbanization

Mathare Township outside Nairobi, Kenya is illegally build on government land with no acces to public water, sanitation and electricity. Open sewers run in the streets. Litter and plastic is everywhere. A group of Young Red Cross volunteers have taken an initiative to clean up, but the job is overwhelming. Private people make long pipelines from the main water supply far away and make a living out of selling drinking water. The same goes for electricity with dangerous wirering. People live in houses made of wood and metal plates using small stowes for cooking. The density of people and houses is high in Mathare and fires are frequent and spread fast. A girl is passing the place where several houses burnt and people died in he fire. On the ground a page from a school notebook is talking about good citizenship, participation in community development, participation in elections and involvement in government.
refugees #3
reportage

refugees #3

On a journey for the Red Cross, I visited a refugee camp in Lithuania. In practice, the camp was a prison containing many nationalities. Pakistanis, who drove the time playing cricket, Afghans, a Russian woman who wanted to go to the United States with her daughter ... The physical conditions of the camp - the rooms, the beds, the bathing conditions - were not humane and during our visit there was trouble between the residents and the guards encouraged by our visit from outside in this time wastage, which seemed isolated and forgotten by the outside world. Refugee Camp, Lithuania, 1998.
earthquake
reportage

earthquake

At 8.46 in the morning of the 26th January 2001 an earthquake hit the province Gujarat leaving 400.000 homes in India and neighbouring Pakistan destroyed killing between 13.000 and 20.000 people. The epicentre was just 20 km's away from the town Bhuj, which was completely destroyed. Houses were laid open with family photos hanging on the walls. Local residents would go around looking for their possessions in the ruins of their houses. Volunteers and professionals from India and the world came looking for survivors in the rubble. Tents were raised and people standing in long lines for food distributed by the red cross / red crescent and other organisations. After a few days mostly dead people were found under the rubble and cremated immediately after with a short ceremony in the smell of burning sandal wood. Warning: strong images.
refugees #1
reportage

refugees #1

On my first trip to Africa, I visited the refugee camp Wad Sharifey. A camp that since 1968 had housed the refugees from Eritrea, who fought for independence from Ethiopia. The camp was situated in a dry and warm area in the borderland near the town of Kassala. Many of the residents lived a life on the border of hunger. In the camp's small hospital, they treated many eye infections due to dust and newcomers who, on foot, had crossed the desert area from Eritrea and were dehydrated, especially the small children who did not always survive. The camp still exists today. Wad Sharifey Camp for Eritrean refugees, The Sudan, 1991
refugees #2
reportage

refugees #2

In may 1991 I was in Kassala in Sudan near the border to Eritrea photographing refugees from Eritrea in The Wad Sharifey Camp. Soon after fighting broke out in Eritrea between Eritrean People’s Liberation Front and Ethiopian government soldiers. The dictator Mengistu Haile Mariam had fled Ethiopia and his regime had collapsed. Thousands of government soldiers fled over the border into the semi desert land between Tessenei and Kassala, dehydrated in the heat and with many wounded. Many died before help slowly started to arrive. Warning: strong images.
romania after ceauşescu
reportage

romania after ceauşescu

Demonstrations and first elections in may 1990. In May 1990, the University Square in Bucharest was filled with protesters. The first free elections were on the stairs and the hope of a new life freed from Ceauşescu and communism was alive. A democratic revolution. I photographed the election in a small rural town near Bucharest, I forgot its name. The election brought Ion Iliescu to power by overwhelming majority. Since then he has been charged with crimes against humanity by being responsible for the lives of hundreds of people who died in connection with the Romanian revolution. He himself belonged to the political elite under Ceauşescu and has since been accused of enriching people from the old regime, among others persons from the secret police Securitate. So maybe the Democratic Revolution was nothing more than a palace coup. Today, despite membership of the EU, Romania remains one of Europe's poorest and most corrupt countries.
ceauşescus children
reportage

ceauşescus children

Orphanages in the Timișoara province, May 1990. Conditions in the Romanian orphanages were revealed to the outside world after Ceausescus regime broke down in 1989. Children left to themselves in beds or sitting in groups in bare rooms, children with illnesses, wounds and scabies, children with physical or mental disabilities, malnourished and with no care and love. In an attempt to increase the birthrate in order to fuel economic growth in the late sixties, Ceaușescu made abortion illegal for women under 40 with fewer than four children, announcing “the foetus is the property of the entire society.” From the late 70s in a society with widespread poverty many children would end up in state orphanages even though they had parents. Orphanages with no money and little, uneducated and poorly paid staff.
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